Deep cleaning is a procedure done to alleviate the swelling, inflammation, and bleeding due to plaque and tartar build-up along the gum lines and the roots of the teeth.
Aside from easing the disorder, deep cleaning also helps prevent gum disease from becoming more severe.

Deep cleaning is a non-invasive and non-surgical procedure. It typically involves deep scaling and root planing. Deep scaling is the process of scraping the plaque below and above the gum lines.

What is Deep Cleaning?

Deep cleaning is a procedure done to alleviate the swelling, inflammation, and bleeding due to plaque and tartar build-up along the gum lines and the roots of the teeth. Aside from easing the disorder, deep cleaning also helps prevent gum disease from becoming more severe.

How is Deep Cleaning Done

Deep cleaning is typically done with a combination of ultrasonic instruments and hand instruments.

Ultrasonic instruments are powered by electricity or air and it has a high-frequency vibrating motion that removes the plaque off. It also releases water that helps remove debris around the teeth and pockets. Meanwhile hand instruments are typically used in order to remove any residual deposits on the tooth.

Depending on the severity of your condition, deep cleaning may be performed in quadrants. If you only have gingivitis or a mild case of gum disease, the procedure may be done in one appointment. Meanwhile, if one quadrant has more build-up than the others, treatment may be scheduled on two or more meetings.

Deep cleaning is typically recommended for individuals that have gingivitis, a mild form of gum disease, or to address periodontal disease, which is a more serious gum infection where inflammation or infection of the gums and surrounding oral tissues occurs.

When is Deep Cleaning Needed?

Deep cleaning is typically recommended for individuals that have gingivitis, a mild form of gum disease, or to address periodontal disease, which is a more serious gum infection where inflammation or infection of the gums and surrounding oral tissues occurs.

Gum disease results from bacterial plaque. When it builds up, it hardens and turns into a rough and porous substance called tartar. Tartar releases toxins that affect the gum fibers that are responsible for holding the teeth. As a result, periodontal pockets are formed and bacteria and toxins build up in them, which causes inflammation and infection. If it continues to go untreated, the situation can become more severe and may result to tooth loss.